Praise for Patrick Zimmerli and Emergence

"The irresistible energy seemed to come from everywhere—jazz harmonies, classical structures, an Arvo-Pärt-like meditativeness, and fleeting touches of cheerfully melodic pop were all on tap..."
(Allan Kozinn, NEW YORK TIMES)

"The first thing to hit you is the rhythm—a cascading flow that sweeps all before it. Then you start noticing what else has been caught up in the flow—exotic pentatonic modes, jazzy syncopations, jagged faux-Arabic metrical constructions, even enough pop-tune motifs to keep listeners on their toes… An amazingly broad range of musical and emotional resources unfold with a nearly unerring sense of balance and when to change course."
(Ken Smith, GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE)

"...an impressive accomplishment... Whether from the point of view of Zimmerli's compositions, which are complex and rich especially in terms of rhythm, or the high quality of the performances, which must have been an absolute bear given such tricky material, a mighty success... [Zimmerli's] a composer with an outstanding ear for layers and a personal way of creating transformations within a given piece, and he's an excellent soprano saxophonist."
(John Corbett, DOWNBEAT MAGAZINE)

"Accomplished, witty, jazz-influenced and imaginative, the music is consistently engaging, always heading off in some new and unpredictable direction."
(Melinda Bargreen, SEATTLE TIMES)

"A very individual mix of traditional classical, jazz and contemporary styles..."
(John Sunier, AUDIOPHILE AUDITION)

"The notes accompanying this sixth release from Patrick Zimmerli... give no hint of when he may have fallen to earth from parts unknown, bringing with him an unclassifiable mix of jazz, strings, and electronics…the swirls and clouds of sound that emerge in the set are varied expressions of Zimmerlis adventurousness. Styles are mixed, unrestricted by the boundaries of traditional categories like jazz or classical. Most of the pieces are Zimmerli compositions dominated by the interplay between electronic and acoustic instruments. Yet the bossa nova rhythms of Jobim's How Insensitive, floating gently on violins, sax, and piano, also fit quite nicely here... Each of these pieces creates its own mood. The common thread throughout is a real sense of commitment to exploring fresh possibilities." (Andrew Velez, ALL ABOUT JAZZ)

"Gracefully melds classical and jazz elements."
(Lawrence A. Johnson, GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE)

"...should appeal to listeners in many different areas. Zimmerli has combined his sax, piano and electric bass with a string quartet and synths to create a rich and varied sonic tapestry influenced by many different elements. There is creative interplay of the electronic instruments with the acoustic ones, some touches of ambient music, minimalist approaches, and Middle Eastern music… One track is not his original, and I think it's the most tasteful arrangement of the bossa nova hit How Insensitive that I've ever laid ears on... sit back and bathe in the striking sounds that surround you in this audiophile-quality 5.0 SACD mix and the terminology will be secondary."
(John Henry, AUDIOPHILE AUDITION)

"An emotional journey. Very enjoyable."
(SA-CD.net)

"Authentically charts a middle course between genres."
(Ken Smith, GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE)

"Masterfully designed progressive jazz... Zimmerli shows a flair for crafting sanguine melodies atop budding string arrangements... While the music is loaded with alluring contrapuntal phrasings and gravitating choruses, it's the seamless and interrelated flow that tags the distinctive edge. Zimmerli's lines conjure up notions of a dream, a scene or a personal experience that is analogous to a paragon of virtue."
(Glenn Astarita, DOWNBEAT MAGAZINE)

"...original, serious, and well-written...the music is conventionally tonal...but it does contain a lot of interesting harmonic action. Variety abounds...yet I sense a consistent, satisfying whole. Is this, then, easy music? No, it is still dense and often complex (remember Beethoven?) but it has a vibrant spirit that comes across at first hearing..."
(James H. North, FANFARE MAGAZINE)